race

Health
4:12 pm
Mon November 17, 2014

In 'Straight White Men,' A Play Explores The Reality Of Privilege

Gary Wilmes, James Stanley and Pete Simpson star in Young Jean Lee's Straight White Men.
Julieta Cervantes

Originally published on Tue November 18, 2014 10:40 am

The straight white men of Straight White Men aren't what you might expect. Near the beginning of the new off-Broadway play, two adult brothers play a homemade, family board game, refashioned out of an old Monopoly set. Because the family is liberal and progressive, it's called "Privilege." It makes fun of their own straight-white-male privilege.

"Ah, 'excuses' card!" one of the brothers exclaims. The other reads it aloud. "What I just said wasn't racist/sexist/homophobic because I was joking," he deadpans. "Pay $50 to an LGBT organization."

Read more
Culture
3:47 pm
Fri May 30, 2014

Ralph Ellison: No Longer The 'Invisible Man' 100 Years After His Birth

Ralph Ellison in 1957, four years after his novel Invisible Man won the National Book Award. Ellison died in 1994.
James Whitmore The Life Picture Collection/Getty Images

Originally published on Fri May 30, 2014 6:07 pm

A monument outside 730 Riverside Drive in Harlem, N.Y. — writer Ralph Ellison's longtime home — commemorates his life and his work. The marker, and many biographical sources, list his birth date as being 1914. But in fact, he was born a year earlier.

Still, events in Oklahoma City — his birthplace — and New York City, where he spent most of his life, are celebrating the centennial of his birth this year.

Read more
Culture
8:32 pm
Sun March 30, 2014

The Journey From 'Colored' To 'Minorities' To 'People Of Color'

Can race and ethnicity be represented by the colors found in a crayon box?
lilivanili Flickr

Originally published on Mon March 31, 2014 3:00 pm

Language is and always will be an essential element in the struggle for understanding among peoples. Changes in the words and phrases we use to describe each other reflect whatever progress we make on the path toward a world where everyone feels respected and included.

Read more
Culture
3:14 pm
Wed February 12, 2014

At 102, Reflections On Race And The End Of Life

Rosa Finnegan in her nursing home. "As nice as this place is," she says, "there's an undercurrent — it's sad, also. I get up now in the morning and I'll say to myself, 'What am I gonna do all day now?' "
Caitrin Lynch for NPR

Originally published on Thu February 13, 2014 12:22 pm

Rosa Finnegan celebrated her 102nd birthday on Wednesday. She was born in 1912 — the year the Titanic sank. She stopped working at 101 and now lives in a nursing home in Massachusetts. Time has gone by fast, she says.

Below are excerpts from Rosa's interview, reported and produced by Ari Daniel and Caitrin Lynch.

'Not One Bit Different From Me'

Read more
Culture
3:55 am
Tue February 11, 2014

Study: Stereotypes Drive Perceptions Of Race

Originally published on Tue February 11, 2014 1:27 pm

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

Governments, schools and companies all keep track of your race. The stats they collect are used to track the proportion of blacks and whites who graduate from school, for example. They tell us how many people identify themselves as Native American or Asian. They help us to measure health disparities between races. But there's a problem with all of those statistics and with the deeper way that we think about race. NPR's social science correspondent Shankar Vedantam is here to explain. Hi, Shankar.

Read more
Culture
11:09 am
Sun January 26, 2014

Growing Up 'White,' Transracial Adoptee Learned To Be Black

Chad Goller-Sojourner (center) and his family.
Courtesy Chad Goller-Sojourner

Originally published on Mon January 27, 2014 8:08 am

A couple of weeks ago, Weekend Edition Sunday host Rachel Martin spoke to Rachel Garlinghouse, a white adoptive mother of three African-American children. Our conversation on transracial adoption drew a lot of responses, so we decided to follow up with another perspective.

Read more
Code Switch
12:13 pm
Sat January 11, 2014

Conversation About 'SNL' And Diversity 'Just Getting Started'

Meet Sasheer Zamata, Saturday Night Live's new cast member.
Heidi Gutman ABC via Getty Images

Originally published on Fri January 10, 2014 12:10 pm

It may seem, now that Saturday Night Live has hired a black female cast member and two black female writers, that the conversation about diversity on TV's most influential comedy show is over.

But it's just getting started.

Read more
Culture
11:56 am
Sat January 11, 2014

Who Gets To Be A Superhero? Race And Identity In Comics

Orion Martin reimagined several iconic X-Men covers, recasting the superheroes as people of color. The move sparked a discussion on race in comics, both on the page and in the writers' rooms.
Orion Martin

Originally published on Sun January 12, 2014 6:20 pm

The X-Men comic franchise has proven remarkably sturdy in the half-century since its launch. They've spawned dozens of animated series and four major Hollywood films with a fifth due out this summer. A big part of that is due to its central premise — a minority of superpowered humans called mutants are discriminated against by their government and fellow citizens — which has functioned as a sci-fi allegory for everything from the civil rights movement to the AIDS crisis.

Read more
Culture
11:54 am
Sat January 11, 2014

The Church Bathroom That Stood As A Monument To A Segregated Past

The old bathroom building behind Our Lady of Peace Catholic Church in rural Vacherie, La. The structure was demolished in October.
Pam Folse Our Lady of Peace

Originally published on Sat January 11, 2014 11:53 am

The old bathroom building behind Our Lady of Peace Catholic Church in rural Vacherie, La., was little more than a shack. Hurricane Rita almost knocked it down in 2005. It finally got bulldozed in October.

Some members of the parish say that was long overdue.

When the bathroom building went up in 1959, one set of doors was painted white; the others were a different color. Ushers would follow black parishioners outside to make sure they entered the correct door.

Read more
Culture
3:43 pm
Tue December 3, 2013

Why Chaucer Said 'Ax' Instead Of 'Ask,' And Why Some Still Do

Keegan-Michael Key and Jordan Peele talk Ax vs. Ask with NPR's Shereen Marisol Meraji.
Sonari Glinton NPR

Originally published on Tue December 3, 2013 5:39 pm

Read more

Pages