same-sex marriage

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DAVID GREENE, HOST:

Marriage in Louisiana: What Just Happened

Jul 3, 2015
Victoria Pickering / Flickr

No matter what your perspective on marriage it has been a remarkable week.

It's certainly been a whirlwind for Kenneth Upton. He's a lawyer for Lambda Legal and lead counsel for the plaintiffs in the Robicheaux case that challenged Louisiana’s ban on same-sex marriage. A final ruling in that case has been issued in the wake of the Supreme Court's decision that same-sex couples can marry.

The ACLU of Louisiana has filed a lawsuit against Governor Bobby Jindal over an executive order he issued in May implementing protections for business owners with religious objections to same-sex marriage. 

The Supreme Court decision Friday that upheld the right of same-sex couples to marry was one for the history books. Obergefell v. Hodges was exalted by gay rights groups and their supporters, and condemned by those who believe that marriage should be reserved for one man and one woman.

Opponents of same-sex marriage say that the fight is far from over.

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

After the Supreme Court's decision effectively legalizing same-sex marriage nationwide came down at 10 a.m. ET, the 2016 hopefuls weighed in quickly.

The Republican side of the field has opposed same-sex marriage, but in responding to Friday's decision, most of the candidates struck a measured tone — many noting they support traditional marriage and religious freedom and disagree with the court — but also stressed the importance of respect and tolerance for all Americans.

Hitting a new all-time high, 60 percent of Americans say they believe marriage between same-sex couples should be recognized by law, with the same rights and privileges as traditional marriages, according to the latest Gallup poll.

The Texas Legislature is sending a message this week on the subject of same-sex marriage. And that message is: Hell no — again.

The bill that just got initial approval in the Texas Senate would protect clergy from having to conduct any marriage ceremony or perform any service that would violate their sacred beliefs.

"We want to make sure they are not ever coerced into performing a marriage ceremony that would violate their sincerely held religious beliefs," State Sen. Craig Estes told NPR. Estes sponsored the bill.

Demonstrators for and against same-sex marriage rallied in front of the Supreme Court on Tuesday morning.
Emily Jan / NPR

This week, in the Obergefell case, the Supreme Court heard arguments on whether the 14th amendment— the one with the equal protection clause — requires states to license marriages between people of the same sex or if requires states to recognize same-sex marriages conferred by another state.  

To that question, Louisiana says no in a friend-of-the-court brief that 15 states signed on to.

Kyle Duncan is the counsel of record on that brief, and is defending Louisiana's constitutional definition of marriage as the union of one man and one woman in other cases. In one case, the state has sued the Dept. of Labor over a change to the Family and Medical Leave Act that would extend benefits to same-sex spouses.
 


The justices of the U.S. Supreme Court seemed closely divided Tuesday over the question of gay marriage, with Justice Anthony Kennedy likely holding the deciding vote.

Kennedy, who over the past two decades has written the court's three decisions recognizing and expanding gay rights, seemed conflicted on the question of marriage.

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