smart growth

WRKF asked people at the Louisiana Smart Growth Summit this question.
Amy Jeffries / WRKF

WRKF set up its Recording Booth at the Louisiana Smart Growth Summit, put on by the Center for Planning Excellence at the Shaw Center back in November.

People at the summit — planners, landscape architects, public officials, environmentalists — were asked a simple question: What does “smart growth” look like in Baton Rouge?

The answers could almost be a set of new year’s resolutions for the city...


A visit with former NFL great Kevin Mawae and actor Michael Papajohn; both former standouts at LSU, who'll be inducted into the university's Hall Of Distinction tonight. 

John Price, with Mayor Holden's office and Camille Manning Broome, with the Center for Planning Excellence, discuss the Better Block Baton Rouge Project and plans for Government Street, in the Mid-city area.

Local attorney Beau Jones, with Bike Baton Rouge, who advocates for initiatives like the Better Block BR Project, to make the city more bicycle friendly.

Chris Williams, Eric Deggans, James Lima

Nov 27, 2012

Jim chats with Chris Williams, editor of “The Richard Burton Diaries”, a collection of the great actor’s writings and diary entries.

Author Eric Deggans discusses his book, “Race-Baiter”, about the powerful ways modern media feeds fears, prejudices, and hate to attract and maintain an audience.

Architect and community planning expert James Lima, who’ll be speaking Nov. 28 at the Smart Growth Summit at the Manship Theatre in Baton Rouge.


Mitchell J. Silver opened the Louisiana Smart Growth Summit last night with constructive criticism of the capital city and its leaders. Silver serves in the Department of City Planning in Raleigh, North Carolina.

WRKF

Vice President of the East Baton Rouge Redevelopment Authority Mark Goodson is part of panel discussion at the Smart Growth summit downtown Tuesday that will delve into the issue of redeveloping neglected and abandoned properties.

The Redevelopment Authority says in 2009, East Baton Rouge Parish had some 6,500 adjudicated parcels of land. That’s somewhere between 2 and 3 percent of all the parcels in the parish. The Authority is currently conducting a study in tandem with the Center for Community Progress to bring that information up-to-date. The numbers, however, are projected to be similar.   

Goodson says Baton Rouge should take a more robust approach to code enforcement to reduce blight like Atlanta, Portland, and even New Orleans already have.