A termite.
LSU AgCenter

The next several months are a popular time for adding new beds of shrubs, ground covers, and flowers to the landscape. It's also a popular time for reworking and replanting existing beds you may have.

When you're dealing with beds right next to your house, this work can affect your home's termite protection.

Houses are typically protected from subterranean termite damage with chemical barriers in the soil. To protect the structure, the soil immediately next to the slab or piers is treated with a long-lasting liquid termiticide. The presence of this chemical in the soil provides a protective seal that prevents termites from tunneling through the soil and entering your home.

This protective treated soil should never be disturbed or altered. Also be careful with mulch, as mulch can provide a bridge past the treated soil which termites can use to enter your home.

LSU AgCenter

I get emails from all over the state, but especially here from southeastern Louisiana.  A common issue over the past couple months has been the myriad of problems caused by the excessive rainfall we've had.

I love numbers. A picture may be worth a thousand words, but I think a good bar graph can be worth a thousand pictures.

But three times in the past few days, I've come across statistics in reputable-looking publications that made me stop and say, "Huh?"

I did some investigating so you don't have to. And indeed, the numbers don't quite tell the story that they purport to tell.

So here goes: My skeptical inquiry into statistics on herbicide use, soil erosion, and the production of fruits and nuts.