state budget

As reporters and analysts dug deeper into the state budget proposal this week, the plan was scrutinized for it's creative financing, including using the Coastal Protection and Restoration Fund as a pass-through account.


LSU President and Chancellor F. King Alexander stops by the studio to talk with Jim about LSU sports, student debts, the TOPS program, the new pressures due to decreased taxpayer funding, as well as a number of issues posed by numerous callers.

Also, former State Budget Director Steve Winham joins Jim to discuss the upcoming state budget and new library in St. Francisville, while Internationally known Theologian Rebecca Parker calls in to discuss Christianity in the second millennium.

With all the sleet and freezing rain that seized up our brains in the past week, it would be easy to forget that in the midst of the first sneaux day last Friday, the Jindal administration presented its budget proposal. The budget is approximately $25 billion. And that’s about $600 million less than the spending for the current fiscal year.


Insight: An Almost Balanced Budget Mid-Year

Jan 17, 2014

The Revenue Estimating Conference, which crunches the numbers on the state’s income every year, announced on Wednesday that revenues are $35 million short of what was expected for 2013-2014. But for the first time since Gov. Bobby Jindal took office, there should be no mid-year cuts to Louisiana's budget.
 


Jim talks with State Treasurer John N. Kennedy about the state budget, non-governmental organizations (NGO's) that won't account for state money given to them and a proposed $2-million center for former Governor Mike Foster's paper, in Franklin.

Jim recaps the LSU-Texas A&M game


In the final hours of the legislative session, lawmakers have passed a $25.4 billion budget compromise to finance the state for the fiscal year that starts July 1.

The Senate approved the deal with a 38-1 vote. The House voted 104-0 Thursday and the deal has Gov. Bobby Jindal’s backing.

The budget includes a $69 million increase for local school districts and teachers sought by House Democrats. To address concerns of House Republicans, lawmakers cut down the use of one-time financing for recurring expenses. 

After lawmakers negotiated for days, Gov. Bobby Jindal was the first to call a press conference, at around 7 p.m. Wednesday, to announce the budget deal had been reached.

According to The Advocate, the conference was premature — many representatives had yet to talk to their delegations and the final papers had yet been signed.

With a 95-3 vote, a nearly $25 billion budget is heading to the Senate for approval after days of negotiations. But it’s not the plan Gov. Bobby Jindal wanted.

The State Supreme Court has ruled that the state can't pay private school tuition through the same funding channel as it uses to support public schools.

Now, Gov. Bobby Jindal is going to have to find another way to keep the voucher program going.

A coalition of state representatives is pushing a slew of bills and amendments to reform Louisiana’s budget process. The lawmakers are fed up with rushed legislation, cutting higher education and healthcare year after year, and procedural tomfoolery.

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