taxes

Sue Lincoln
Kelly Tate

WRKF's voice of Capitol Access, Sue Lincoln, joins us for our weekly look at the legislative session. This week, we saw the withdrawal of Gov. John Bel Edwards' plan to impose the Corporate Activities Tax. Also this week, LSU AgCenter Chancellor Bill Richardson gave an update on the state's plan to get the medical marijuana program up and running by January 2018.


Michael Henderson
Sue Lincoln

Michael Henderson, Director of the LSU Public Policy Lab, discusses his research finding Louisiana voters in some cases are receptive to tax increases.

This is information that the governor and lawmakers may weigh as they prepare for the start of a legislative session in which the state budget is front and center.


Gov. John Bel Edwards
Sue Lincoln

WRKF Capitol Access reporter Sue Lincoln joins us to compare the "cookie" and the "cleaning the room" elements of the governor's comprehensive tax reform package. We also hear tape as Michael Henderson from the LSU Public Policy Research Lab reviews part of the Louisiana Survey and what it says about public perception and expectations regarding taxes.


Elliott Stonecipher
YouTube

Elliott Stonecipher, veteran pollster and demographer, analyzes why, since the 1970s, Louisiana has lagged behind other states, including those in the South, in population growth. Stonecipher takes calls from listeners illustrating loved ones who have left Louisiana for opportunity and other reasons.

Stonecipher also examines how the tax proposal by Gov. John Bel Edwards will resonate with lawmakers and the electorate and explains why he sees a correlation between taxation and population stagnation.


Robert Travis Scott
Public Affairs Research Council of Louisiana

Gov. John Bel Edwards plans to unveil his tax plan today. Public Affairs Research Council President Robert Travis Scott will help us analyze the tax plan and assess its impact on Louisiana businesses.

Also joining us for this segment, we have State Rep. Steve Carter (R-Baton Rouge), who will discuss his push for a 17-cent gasoline tax to help restore state roads and bridges.


Sue Lincoln

We heard it repeatedly throughout the special session:

“I can assure you, nobody wants to raise revenue. Nobody wants to raise taxes.”

“No one wants higher taxes.”

“I’ve heard the speeches: ‘I’m not voting for any new taxes’.”

“Nobody wants to see their taxes increase.”

Most times those statements were followed by the word, “but”.

The new 2016 Louisiana Survey, done by the LSU Public Policy Research Lab shows that lawmakers should have been listening to what came after the word “but”.

Sue Lincoln

How are the candidates for governor planning to fix the state’s deficit—and what will that mean for the taxes you pay? Thus far, Scott Angelle, Jay Dardenne, John Bel Edwards and David Vitter have offered more generalities than specifics.


As the young U.S. senator takes the oath to become president, he sets out to fix an economy struggling with rising unemployment, slumping profits and depressed stock prices.

He knows the deep recession could prevent him from advancing his broader domestic and diplomatic agenda. Yes — all true for President Obama.

But that's what John F. Kennedy faced as well. On his frosty Inauguration Day in January 1961, Kennedy had to start fulfilling his campaign pledge to "get America moving again." Like Obama, he would need to win over a deeply skeptical business community.