unemployment

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The latest state employment figures are out, and the song remains the same one we’ve heard before from legislative fiscal analyst Greg Albrecht.

“We’ve been in a real decline, while the rest of the country has not. What we really need is job growth.”

Louisiana’s 5.7% unemployment rate, compared to the national average of 4.3%, is impacting sales tax and personal income tax collections, which together make up 61% of total state revenue.

Theologian Rev. Dr. Matthew Fox, the author of 30+ books, joins us to promote his recent work Occupy Spirituality: A Radical Vision for a New Generation

The Executive Editor of American Hunter Magazine and New York Times Best Selling Author Frank Miniter talks with Jim about his most recent book The Future of the Gun. He and Jim discuss gun rights, what's happening right now in Ferguson, MO., training courses for gun owners, etc...

Also, Kristi Williams with the Louisiana Department of Economic Development stops by the studio to discuss the new Louisiana Job Connection website http://louisianajobconnection.com. She describes the newest website as a "dating site" which seeks to match the right job seeker with the right employer looking to hire.


It makes some sense that young people might work less than their older counterparts. They are figuring out their lives, going in and out of school and making more short-term plans.

But a whopping 5.8 million young people are neither in school nor working. It is "a completely different situation than we've seen in the past," says Elisabeth Jacobs, the senior director for policy and academic programs at the Washington Center for Equitable Growth.

The easiest time to get hired at one of the seven oil refineries in the Los Angeles area is during what's called a turnaround. These breaks, when the refineries are shut down for routine maintenance, are incredibly labor-intensive. And refineries want to get them done as quickly as possible.

So companies need enough people to get the job done. But those workers must have specific skills.

In this line of work, as with other U.S. industries, there's a skills gap.

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SCOTT SIMON, HOST:

In recent years, companies ranging from JPMorgan Chase to Walmart to Boeing have announced special hiring programs for veterans. Seattle coffee giant Starbucks is the latest.

All of these companies are trying to bring down a stubbornly high unemployment rate for veterans of the Iraq and Afghanistan wars. But to succeed, companies have to take the time to understand the skills of service members.