voter turnout

courtesy: @JSODonaghue

Republican and former state representative John Schroder has been elected Louisiana Treasurer, with less than 13 percent of all registered voters actually participating. Political analyst John Couvillon says that clearly affected Schroder’s margin of victory.

C-Span

It’s hard to tell what aggravates Louisiana Secretary of State Tom Schedler more: The expected low turnout for tomorrow’s statewide election, or the cost of holding it.

 

“It costs $6 million here in Louisiana to run a statewide election,” Schedler said, speaking on C-Span last week. "It costs me the same amount of money to run a presidential election at close to 70 percent voter turnout as it will cost me to have a 12 percent voter turnout."

“We can certainly put our money at better usages here in Louisiana, in my opinion,” he added.

Edwards campaign/Schroder campaign

Early voting for the Nov. 18 State Treasurer runoff continues through Friday, with Secretary of State Tom Schedler saying he expects overall turnout to be “horrible.”

“I am anticipating 11, 12 percent turnout for this election,” Schedler says.


Edwards campaign: Schroder campaign

Less than 14-percent of Louisiana’s three million registered voters cast ballots in Saturday’s statewide election, but they sent the Treasurer’s race to a runoff next month between Democrat Derrick Edwards and Republican John Schroder.


Secretary of State Tom Schedler
Sue Lincoln

Secretary of State Tom Schedler addresses concerns about voter fraud in elections. He also details his efforts to register as many citizens to vote as possible in the state. Shedler says Louisiana boasts one of the highest voter registration rates in the nation, but getting those voters to turn out at the polls is an entirely different idea.


Sue Lincoln

“The one thing I want to encourage everyone to do is to go out and register to vote if you’re not.”

Secretary of State Tom Schedler is reminding everyone that today is the last day to register to vote in the November 8th election.

“You can register online. It’s safe, it’s quick, it’s secure.” And the web address to do that is www.sos.la.gov .

Early voting for the November 21st runoff continues through Saturday, and Secretary of State Tom Schedler is not yet ready to predict whether voter turnout will exceed last month’s primary.

“You know, this science is not becoming any easier,” Schedler says, with a chuckle.

Turnout for the October 24th primary election was anything but amusing, at a dismal 38.5 percent.

“History would tell you, and data would tell you that we would be below 38-and-a-half percent,” Schedler says. “I think this time we’ll at least match that or maybe increase it, so goes along with everything else in politics today: it’s kind of going against the mainstream of what you would expect.”

S. Lincoln

More than a few political experts have voiced dismay over apparent voter apathy as we head into Saturday’s primary election. Bernie Pinsonat of Southern Media and Opinion Research addressed the Baton Rouge Press Club Monday, saying that’s because the budget problem – big as it is – is nothing new.

“The sky is falling has happened for the last seven years in Louisiana. We went broke – again. And that’s been going on forever.”

Lawmakers have managed to avoid implementing the doomsday scenarios, thus far. So many people believe they don’t have to worry right now.

“They know something’s wrong, but it hasn’t resulted in people paying more taxes,” Pinsonat explains.

Several new surveys show voter interest is low, anti-incumbent sentiment is high, and voters from both parties are questioning whether their elected leaders should return to Congress next year.

In short, the electorate is disengaged and disgusted with politics.

Voter turnout in the 2010 primaries was only about 18 percent, and now it's even lower. Less than 15 percent of eligible citizens cast ballots in the 25 states that have held statewide primaries this year, according to a new report from the Center for the Study of the American Electorate.