Sue Lincoln

Much attention has been paid to the Governor’s race, but who will become the proverbial “one heartbeat away” from Louisiana’s chief executive?

Republican Billy Nungesser and Democrat Kip Holden are the runoff contenders for the job, which duties focus primarily on tourism. Monday, at the Baton Rouge Press Club, each was asked about his goals for the first term, if elected.

Nungesser said he’ll focus on, “Putting a plan together to restore our historical sites, our museums, and growing tourism ten percent a year over the next four years, creating thousands of jobs and economic growth.”

Holden has a different take on the job’s responsibilities.

How Jindal Will Confront Budget Shortfall

Nov 19, 2015
Wallis Watkins

Governor Jindal is back in Louisiana after announcing the end of his presidential campaign on Tuesday. He addressed the press Wednesday at the Governor’s Mansion. 

Wallis Watkins

“This is not my time.”

With those words, Louisiana Governor Bobby Jindal has ended his quest for the White House, a campaign that began with a rally in Kenner on June 24th.

“My name is Bobby Jindal,” he declared then, to cheers from the crowd. “I am governor of the great state of Louisiana, and I am running for President of the greatest country in the world—the United States of America!”

Last evening, Jindal’s announcement was much quieter, given during a one-on-one with Bret Baier on Fox News.

S. Lincoln: screenshot from debate broadcast

The Revenue Estimating Conference met Monday, acknowledging oil and gas prices, sales tax and corporate tax collections are far below what was anticipated.

Legislative fiscal analyst Greg Albrecht summed it up, saying, “We’re a long way from hitting the total forecast.”

The state is $370-million away, in the current fiscal year.  The biggest hole is created not by oil prices, but by corporate taxes. The explanation offered was businesses had rushing to claim tax credits before legislative reductions kicked in.

Dr. David Sathiaraj

For many watchers of political races, it’s a numbers game. Dr. David Sathiaraj, Assistant Professor for Research in Geography and Anthropology at LSU, thinks there’s a better way to crack those numbers.