WRKF News

Smoking Cessation Trust

Back in April, New Orleans banned smoking throughout much of the city. On July 1, 2015, Louisiana’s statewide cigarette tax rose by fifty cents. Mike Rogers, CEO of the Smoking Cessation Trust, thinks that’s driving more Louisianians to drop the habit. 

  

“This should not be a platform for political purposes,” Mayci Breaux’s uncle told Lafayette TV station KLFY last Friday.

We agree, so today we are remembering and honoring two vibrant lives that were taken from us too soon.


Louisiana lawmakers weren’t talking about U.S. Supreme Court justices Thursday, as they discussed the phrase “appointed for life”. They were actually talking about registrars of voters.

“Currently, the way it’s stated in the Constitution, the local governing authority’s responsible for the appointment of the registrar of voters, but beyond that, there’s nothing,” said Rep. Mike Danahay of Sulphur.

Sue Lincoln

There has been plenty of rain, wind, lightning and thunder this summer, followed by numerous power outages. That’s led to more than a few complaints to the Louisiana Public Service Commission.

“’There were eight outages from Tuesday through Sunday of last week’,” PSC member Scott Angelle read from a stack of messages, during Wednesday’s meeting.  “He just feels there were too many to just write off as due to ‘weather-related’ issues.”

CSPAN

In the furor over Donald Trump’s remarks about John McCain, Governor Bobby Jindal’s reception at the Family Leadership Summit this past weekend was somewhat overshadowed.


Ann Marie Awad

The Atchafalaya Basin is a wedge of wetlands that stretches south to the Gulf of Mexico between the Atchafalaya and Mississippi Rivers. At a million-plus acres, it's America's largest freshwater swamp--and it's long been at risk. But with a new land purchase, The Nature Conservancy will experiment with fixes to those problems.


courtesy Southern University

There’s a new president of the Southern University System, and he’s looking at the system’s struggles from a new perspective.

“We can make a difference. We should be making a difference,” says Dr. Ray Belton.

Belton, who previously served as chancellor of Southern-Shreveport before taking on the combined duties of system president and chancellor of the Baton Rouge campus three weeks ago, has ideas about making Southern more inclusive.


Making Streets Safe for Play in North Baton Rouge

Jul 20, 2015
Wallis Watkins

It’s a Saturday afternoon in North Baton Rouge. While cars drive down busy Evangeline Street, there are none to be seen on two blocks in the Brookstown neighborhood. Instead, kids are in the street, running, playing basketball, and jumping rope. 

Sue Lincoln

Oil prices have dropped again, closing just above 50-dollars per barrel all last week. What does that mean for Louisiana’s precariously balanced budget?

“Obviously, if oil prices stay in the low to mid-50s, relative to our 60, 62 dollar price, at some point we’ll have to, you know, reconsider that forecast price,” Legislative fiscal analyst Greg Albrecht says.

Albrecht explains each one dollar drop in the yearly average price of oil costs Louisiana $11-million in revenue.

Harper Collins

There has never been much in public view related to the work of novelist Harper Lee. There were certainly no manuscripts of To Kill a Mockingbird, let alone the newly discovered and now published companion Go Set a Watchman.

While working in special collections at Lee's alma mater, the University of Alabama, Jessica Lacher-Feldman, who is now at LSU, put together exhibitions mostly with writings from the novelist's days as a student and copies of her famous first published book from all over the world.


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