WRKF News

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“This is a horrible tragedy,” said Grambling University communications director Will Sutton, following the early Tuesday morning shooting deaths of two men outside a dorm at GSU. “There’s no place for violence on the Grambling State University campus.”

But with the shootings also comes a now-familiar admonition, that it’s also not the time to talk about gun control.


courtesy: Universal Pictures, imdb.com

As the past two years with six legislative sessions have shown, fixing the fiscal cliff is not easy.

“The citizens of this state do not want to raise their taxes,” insist lawmakers.  In fact, the chairman of the House tax-writing committee states, “I can assure you, nobody wants to raise taxes.”

Nobody really wants to extend the fifth penny of sales tax, either.

Mark Carroll

It’s an oft-repeated theory among state lawmakers: “Our hands are tied because we have dedicated funds,” and “There’s money in stat deds. So isn’t that money just sort of sitting around?”

Slidell Senator Sharon Hewitt is a proponent of that theory, and she ‘s heading a task force looking at eliminating many statutory dedications. But, as she found out during the group’s initial meeting – it don’t come easy.


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How should Louisiana solve for its upcoming $1.4-billion fiscal cliff? This time last year, hopes focused on the work of the Tax Structure Task Force and its recommendations. But as House Speaker Pro Tem Walt Leger said on “Talk Louisiana”, we all know how that turned out.


sos.la.gov (State Archives)

With more than $1.3-billion in state revenue coming off the books next July 1st, there was concern Louisiana wouldn’t be able to borrow any money next fiscal year. For Bon Commission members, those fears were alleviated Thursday.


Around the country, hundreds of millions of dollars have been spent to buy back individual homes from people who have flooded repeatedly. But buying out a whole neighborhood is uncommon. Louisiana's 2016 flood seems to be changing that for two communities. In Pointe Coupee and Ascension Parishes, a buyout program first used in neighborhoods after Superstorm Sandy may offer a new option to homeowners who have lived with escalating risk for decades.

lca.org

A veil of secrecy draped across the Ascension Parish School Board’s approval of four new industrial tax exemptions this week, with no amounts and no job projections given in public documents for the projects code named “Magnolia”, “Zinnia”, “Bagel” and “Sunflower”.

“For them to reveal to the general public new projects and technologies would jeopardize millions of dollars in investment,” insisted the board's Budget Committee chairman Troy Gautreau, Sr.


A New Orleans judicial watchdog group says bail is being set unevenly in Orleans Parish, resulting in dangerous criminals being released while nonviolent offenders get stuck in jail.  

For 17 years, residents in parts of East Baton Rouge, Ascension and Livingston parishes have been paying a local tax to help fund construction of the Comite River Diversion Canal, designed to lower the flood risk of nearby homeowners. Then in 2016, record flooding hit the region — causing billions in damage. The incident only ignited the demand for answers from frustrated taxpayers.

Sue Lincoln

Governor John Bel Edwards has been clear about one proposed – now controversial – project for the state.

“We do favor, as an administration policy, the Bayou Bridge pipeline,” he said, during his radio show last month. “As a state, we have to find a way to transport hydrocarbons to where they are needed in our refineries and in our plants. And I believe overall the safest way to do that is in a pipeline.”


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