WRKF News

Watching Harvey

9 hours ago
LSU Earth Scan Lab

We’re watching Harvey.  No, not the 1950 movie starring Jimmy Stewart, or even the LSU tiger re-christened Mike VII on Monday. This Harvey is the tropical system that fell apart in the Caribbean this past weekend and is now regenerating in the Gulf of Mexico.


Sue Lincoln

“I think that if an eclipse is a time for change and a time for action, we’re in that place now,” said Maxine Crump, as the solar eclipse dimmed and darkened skies across a broad swath of the United States. The director of the Dialog on Race program addressed the Baton Rouge Press Club ten days after the events in Charlottesville, Virginia, had many examining the apparent eclipse of the nation’s soul.


Sue Lincoln

It’s “Voter Registration Week” in Louisiana, and Secretary of State Tom Schedler is urging everyone possible to participate.

“You can go online and do that in about 3 minutes,” Schedler says, by logging onto sos.la.gov. “It’s not that difficult.”


Martine Turner and Kellie Bertrand of the Louisiana Spirit Crisis Counseling Center talk about mental health issues stemming from the historic flood of 2016.


Lt. Gen. Russel Honore
Restore Louisiana Now

Russel Honore addresses the 12th anniversary of Katrina this month, danger in North Korea, unrest in Charlottesville, and environmental issues in Louisiana. An update on the Green Army is in store from Gen. Honore.


wikimedia commons

Now that we’ve established that many state lawmakers suffer from fiscal myopia, are they doing any envisioning – however fuzzy the view – toward Louisiana’s future? Representative Steve Carter, a Baton Rouge Republican, says it’s not the first time he’s been asked that question.


Office of Community Development Executive Director Pat Forbes talks about work remaining in the aftermath of the 2016 flood.


LRN

Louisiana political consultant Gus Weill talks about President Donald Trump's challenges.


LRN

Dick Morris, veteran pollster and writer, talks on why he believes President Donald Trump is the victim of a witch hunt.


Traumatic experiences like major floods can have psychological ramifications. Since Hurricane Katrina, FEMA has sent money to Louisiana to provide counseling for survivors struggling with poor mental health every time a disaster hits the state.

A program called Louisiana Spirit has been providing that service to victims near Baton Rouge since the floods last August. But as the one-year anniversary approaches, the program is winding down — leaving some victims in the lurch.

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