WRKF News

Since rainfall blanketed southeast Louisiana in August 2016, residents have wondered how the state can protect its people from future floods. Answering that question begins with understanding the geography we live in.

Dietmar Rietschier is executive director of the Amite River Basin District. He talks about the historic flood of 2016.


Professor Mak Lilla of Columbia University talks about his book, "The Once and Future Liberal." Lilla's op-ed piece in the New York Times last year, "The End of Identity Liberalism," was the most read op-ed essay of 2016, with 1.6 million views.


LRN

Henry Gass and Noelle Swan of the Christian Science Monitor talk about Louisiana's dwindling coast.


LA DOTD

“I want to say a few words to those who actively worked in opposition to raising the gas tax – ever: this nonsense has hurt the state,” Baton Rouge Representative Steve Carter said when withdrawing his gasoline tax bill from consideration this past spring, effectively calling some of his fellow lawmakers shortsighted.

The tax revenue would have helped with the $13-billion backlog of deferred highway and bridge maintenance.


Nicole Sweazy of the Louisiana Housing Authority talks about the shelter program utilitzed after the historic flood of 2016.


Music Producer Jeff Roedel talks about the art spawned by the flood of 2016, including his song "Fight the Flood."


Journalist Maxine Crump talks about her experience this past year after learning her ancestors were sold as slaves by Georgetown University in 1838.


Flood Recovery: Not-So-Rapid Rehousing

Aug 15, 2017

Federal aid helped pay for hotels for thousands of Louisianans after last year's flood. Until May, the short-term program help people find shelter, especially low-income renters. Now a state-managed program is still filling in the gaps, trying to give more permanent homes to families washed out last year — including a single mother in Baton Rouge.

California Coastal Commission

“I see a deficit of just over $1.5-billion, correct? That's the fiscal cliff we keep talking about?” New Orleans Representative Gary Carter asked, as the latest tally of next July's fall off in state revenue was presented to the Joint Budget Committee last week.

Yet despite all the warning signs, some lawmakers don't see the drop as being all that steep.


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