State Senator Elbert Guillory of Opelousas is running for Lieutenant Governor, and while his campaign budget is minimal, he’s been putting some slickly-produced 2-minute videos up on the internet. One of the most recent ones is raising eyebrows.

“The term ‘nigger’ is part of the American culture,” Guillory states in the video, titled “Let’s Talk About Race.”

There's just one week left until qualifying, and so far we’ve covered the Governor’s race and the candidates for Attorney General. But little has been said about the four candidates vying for Lieutenant Governor - the person who will be in charge when the Governor is out of state and the head of Louisiana tourism. 

Sue Lincoln

Deep horizontal drilling for oil and gas is enormously expensive. The fracking process to release oil and gas from the shale reached by those deep wells is enormously controversial. But when one of those wells comes in, it’s enormously profitable.

“I know for a fact that companies absolutely want to drill those wells because we have that incentive,” Louisiana Oil and Gas Association president Don Briggs says of Louisiana’s severance tax exemption for deep horizontal wells. Passed by the legislature in 1994, it seemed like a good idea at the time, as it was encouraging new technology.

Creating Land at the Edge of Louisiana

Aug 31, 2015
Nick Janzen

  In Bayou Grand Liard, down by the toe of Louisiana’s boot, the Coastal Protection and Restoration Authority is creating marsh. Chuck Perrodin, a spokesman for CPRA, sums up what’s going on: “We’re taking what used to be land and marsh, went back into open water, and now we have made it back into land.”

Creating land where there’s open water seems like an impossible task, but the basic idea is remarkably simple—fill in the water with lots of sand. Finding that sand, and transporting it, is the hard part.

Marsanne Golsby

WRKF’s gubernatorial forum Friday night did not go as planned. Three of the four candidates cancelled on us.

“I want to thank David and Scott and John Bel for not showing up tonight,” Lt. Governor Jay Dardenne quipped. “I don’t think one of them was ever intending to come. The other two have been very faithful at coming to a lot of these, and I have no idea why they didn’t show up.”

Dardenne flew solo, bravely answering dozens of questions posed by the sold-out crowd in attendance.

Ann Marie Awad / WRKF News


Doug Niolet was a seasoned Hurricane Hunter for the Air Force Reserve. So of course, when Hurricane Katrina approached the Gulf Coast ten years ago, he had no plans to evacuate.

Roux Radio 8/28

Aug 28, 2015

On this episode, Hurricane Katrina: the memories, the science and the decade since.

Paul Boger

States across the U-S have increasingly been turning to charter schools in an effort to bolster struggling public school systems. Two of the most recent states to adopt the controversial form of education are Mississippi and Alabama. As part of a Southern Education Desk series examining charter schools in the South, we turn to Mississippi Public Broadcasting‘s Paul Boger for a report on how those states are adopting to the alternative form of public education.

Stephanie Landry

Former Governor Kathleen Blanco stood at the center of a political storm that swirled around the response to Hurricane Katrina. Like all of us who were here for the storm and its aftermath, her memories are filled with stories of fear and courage, heartbreak and healing. She shares the moment when Katrina transformed from pure tragedy to trust in the resilience of Louisiana's citizens.

Louisiana State Police

“Steven Vincent epitomized what it meant to be a Louisiana State Trooper. When you talk about courtesy, loyalty and service – that was him!” Louisiana State Police Commander Mike Edmonson said, his voice husky with unshed tears.

Senior Trooper Steven Vincent is being laid to rest tomorrow, following a noon mass at Our Lady Queen of Heaven Church in Lake Charles. He was killed in the line of duty, after stopping to render assistance.